Voters

How to become an election worker in your state.

Voters

Moving & Registering To Vote

State election laws differ regarding who can assist voters and under what circumstances. Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page to select the state where the voter resides, and contact that local election office for further direction.

Each state has different residency requirements, check with your local election official about registering to vote and voting after a recent move. Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for more information about registering to vote, and links to your state’s election office website.

You must update your address with your local election official when you change residences. Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for more information about registering to vote, and links to your state’s election office website.

All changes to your voter registration, mailing address or otherwise, need to be made through your local election office. Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for more information about registering to vote, updating your voter registration, and contacting your local election office.

 

Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page to select your previous state of residency, and click on the State Election Office Website link in red. Contact the state you lived in previously for further instructions about cancelling your old voter registration.

You may only register to vote in the state that you consider to be your primary place of legal residence. Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for links to state election official websites to contact them for further information.

Visit the Register and Vote in Your State page, select the state in which you reside, click Register to Vote, and follow the prompts on your state’s website. You may also complete the National Mail Voter Registration form, and return it to your local election office.

Visit the Register and Vote in Your State page, select the state in which you reside, click Register to Vote, and follow the prompts on your state’s website. You may also complete the National Mail Voter Registration form, and return it to your local election office.

Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for links to state election official websites to contact them for further information.

You must contact your local state board of elections. Go to /voters/register-and-vote-in-your-state/, scroll down (on the left) find your state, go to that website and contact the board of elections for this information.

For information on your FPCA form, please contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) at (800) 438-8683. You may also visit www.fvap.gov to access the newest Federal Post Card Application form.

Visit the Register and Vote in Your State page, select the state in which you reside, click Register to Vote, and follow the prompts on your state’s website. You may also complete the National Mail Voter Registration form, and return it to your local election office.

National Voter Registration Act

If you are voting for the first time in your state and are registering by mail, Federal Law may require you to show proof of identification the first time you vote.  This proof of identification includes the following (or if voting by mail, a COPY of the following):

A current and valid photo identification; OR
A current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document that shows your name and address.

Federal law does not require you to show proof of identification at the polling place or when voting by mail if (1) you provided COPIES of the above with your National Mail Voter Registration Form; (2) your voter registration form has been verified by an election official; or (3) you are entitled by federal law to vote by absentee ballot.  Please note that individual states may have additional voter identification requirements.

The National Mail Voter Registration Form consists of four parts: 

  • The Application
  • The General Instructions
  • The Application Instructions
  • The State Instructions 

Any U.S. citizen residing in the fifty United States or the District of Columbia may use this form, with the following exceptions:

North Dakota, Wyoming and U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa and Guam) do not accept this form. New Hampshire accepts the form only as a request for an absentee ballot.

 

Only the one-page application is needed.
 

If you feel your registration form was unjustly rejected, contact your local election official. You may also contact the voting section of the Department of Justice at (800) 253-3931, or your state’s Attorney General’s office.

After you have submitted your registration form, you may receive a confirmation from your local election office that you are registered. If you do not receive a confirmation, call your local election office before the registration deadline to confirm you are registered.

 

Yes. States that accept the National form will allow for copies of the application printed from the computer image on regular paper stock to be submitted.

You may furnish a supply of only the voter registration applications either, printed on card stock according to the FEC specifications, or produced on 8.5' x 11’ regular weight paper. Include envelopes with the regular weight applications. The general and state instructions may be photocopied and handed out with each application, or enlarged and posted at the registration site.

An organization may mail completed Voter Registration Applications to the appropriate election office(s) individually or in a bundle. The Department of Justice interprets the cost of first class postage to fall into the realm of "facilitating" voter registration, and not as an attempt to induce an individual to register to vote by giving something of value, which would be prohibited by the "vote buying" provisions of the Voting Rights Act.

How to become an election worker in your state.

Visit our Register and Vote in Your State page for links to state election official websites to contact them for further information.

You may also call your local election office for more information.