United States Election Assistance Comittee

Register to Vote!

Use the National Mail Voter Registration Form to register to vote, update your registration information with a new name or address, or register with a political party.

Note: If you wish to vote absentee and are a uniformed service member or family member or a citizen living outside the U.S., contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program to register to vote.

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Military and Overseas Voters

EAC has several projects under way to assist states in serving military and overseas citizens who register and vote absentee under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act. Learn more

Resources for Voters



Voting Tips for Elections (download tips card) also see voter guides

 

Before the next election, be familiar with the voting process in your State. The following tips from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission may help enhance your voting experience.

 

Register to vote. Most States require citizens to be registered in order to vote. Make sure you understand the voter registration requirements of your State of residence. If you are not registered to vote, you must apply for voter registration no later than the deadline to register in your State. Contact your local or State elections office or check their Web site for information on how to obtain a voter registration application and the deadline to register. The National Voter Registration Application form is also available.

 

If you are already registered to vote. Confirm your voter registration status with your State or local elections office before the last day to register to vote. This will allow you to make any changes to your registration (for example: name, address, or other corrections) in sufficient time to vote.

 

Polling place location & hours. If you vote at a polling place on Election Day, confirm your polling place location and make sure you know what time your polling place opens and closes on Election Day.

 

Voter identification (ID) requirements. Some States may require you to show ID in order to vote. You can find out what your State ID requirements are by contacting your State or local elections office or checking their Web site.

 

Provisional voting. Federal law allows you to cast a provisional ballot if your name does not appear on the voter registration record, if you do not have ID, or if there are questions about your eligibility to vote. Your State may provide other reasons for voting by a provisional ballot. Whether a provisional ballot is counted depends on verification of your eligibility. Make sure you are familiar with the provisional voting process in your State.

 

Polling place accessibility. If you are a voter with special needs or specific concerns due to a disability, contact your local elections office for information, advice, and educational materials about voting equipment and details on access to the polling place, including designated parking.

 

Early voting. Some States allow voters to vote in person before Election Day. Find out if your State has early voting or in-person absentee voting and, if so, when and where you can vote before Election Day.

 

Absentee voting requirements. Most States allow voters to vote using an absentee ballot under certain circumstances. Check on the dates and requirements for requesting and returning an absentee ballot before Election Day. Absentee ballots are available many weeks before the election but often must be returned before Election Day.

 

Military voting. Special voting procedures may apply if you are in the U.S. military or an American citizen residing overseas. You may qualify for an absentee ballot by submitting a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA). Contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program or check its Web site at www.fvap.gov for information relating to military and overseas voters.

 

For more information on these tips and for answers to other questions about the election process, visit www.eac.gov or contact your State or local elections office.
 

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EAC Resources for Voters - One of EAC’s primary mandates under the Help America Vote Act is to serve as a central resource for information about elections. Through EAC’s national clearinghouse, the public will find information about topics such as registering to vote and serving as a poll worker along with studies on how, where and when we vote. EAC is also responsible for maintaining the National Mail Voter Registration form, which can be used in any state to register to vote in a federal election. EAC also provides information about registering to vote and contact information for each state elections office.